Core

Keisha John

Keisha John is Director of Diversity Programs. In this role she collaborates with various university offices to lead and coordinate university-wide activities designed to recruit, mentor and foster success among a diverse body of graduate and professional students, as well as postdoctoral scholars. Prior to coming to UVa she was the Assistant Dean and Director of the Office of Graduate Funding and Awards as well as the Director of the Office of Postdoctoral Affairs at Florida State University. She earned her Ph.D.

Francesca Fiorani

Francesca Fiorani is Associate Dean for the Arts and Humanities, Professor of Renaissance Art, and the Primary Investigator for the Mellon Indigenous Arts Initiative at the University of Virginia. 

 

M. Jordan Love

In 2012, The Fralin Museum of Art appointed art historian Melissa Jordan Love as the Museum's first full-time academic curator. The position, funded by a three-year, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Grant, aims to strengthen the museum's curatorial and academic programming mission as a teaching institution. Love develops educational programming around the Museum's exhibitions to enhance the learning of students at the University and the public's understanding of art. 

Margo Smith

Margo Smith AM (PhD, MA UVA, BA Willam & Mary) is the director and curator of the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection at the University of Virginia. She has a PhD in Anthropology from U.Va. and conducted fieldwork in central Australia from 1991-1993. She co-edited Art From the Land: Dialogues with the Kluge-Ruhe Collection of Australian Aboriginal Art with Dr. Howard Morphy published by the University of Virginia in 1999. Smith has worked with the Collection since 1995 and has taught various courses on Aboriginal art at U.Va. since 2003.

Henry F. Skerritt

The Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia is pleased to announce the appointment of Mr. Henry F. Skerritt to its new position, Curator of the Indigenous Arts of Australia.

Adriana Greci Green

Dr. Greci Green is an art historian, curator and anthropologist, whose expertise in Native American art histories holds an emphasis on the Plains and Great Lakes regions. Her research focuses on 18-20th-century American Indian histories, exploring the contexts in which material culture, art, dress, and cultural performance are produced and circulated, both historically and today. She also looks at how Native Americans have been represented in museums, popular culture, and the media. Dr. Greci Green earned her doctoral degree from Rutgers University.

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