Visiting Fellow Raymond Bulambula guides a UVA art student in making a "Marratjirri" Morning Star Pole.

Fayerweather Hall, McIntire Department of Art at the University of Virginia

Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia

Night at the Museum

Thursday, June 21, 2018
Kluge-Ruhe | 5-9pm

Night at the Museum

with live music by Larkspur

$5 non-members, FREE for museum members

Join us for Night at the Museum, your opportunity to explore our exhibitions after hours and enjoy the best food, libations and music in Charlottesville! We always feature live music by a local band, the best local food trucks in town, and drink offerings from a local brewery, a local winery and a local cidery. The event also features a Kids Zone with Australian-themed children’s activities, as well as a Flat Chat Tour, a ten-minute discussion about an artwork on view by a museum staff member. And all of it happens outside at our beautiful location on Pantops, one of the best hidden spots to watch the sunset in Charlottesville.

Not a member? Now is your chance to become one! A special membership offer of $25 per household will be available at the door. In addition to free admission to Night at the Museum all summer long, you’ll receive other great benefits of membership: a 10% discount in our gift shop, invitations to special events and receptions with artists, and advanced notice of upcoming programs.

Opening Reception | Regina Pilawuk Wilson

Friday, May 25, 2018
5:30pm | Second Street Gallery

NGERRINGKRRETY: ONE VOICE, MANY STORIES

Regina Pilawuk Wilson

Second Street Gallery, Charlottesville, VA | May 25 - July 27, 2018

This summer, three exhibitions of Aboriginal art involving one of Australia’s leading contemporary artists, Regina Pilawuk Wilson, will be on view in Charlottesville and Washington, D.C. Join us for an opportunity to meet this remarkable artist, activist and matriarch.

This solo exhibition of Regina's work at Second Street Gallery features paintings on canvas and paper, as well as fiber works and prints. The inspiration for Wilson’s works come from the traditional weaving practices of her people. “My painting,’ says Wilson, ‘it’s about the weaving. In case our daughters or grandchildren forget, it’s on the painting. My big sister told me to do the story on painting for our kids, so they can remember what our ancestors used to do a long time ago. The story, it’s there from a hundred thousand years ago.” In shimmering detail, Wilson recreates weaving techniques in paint on canvas—stitch by stich—creating luminous rhythmic abstractions.  Wilson’s large-scale masterworks, which have brought her international acclaim, will be exhibited alongside her virtuosic fiber-works that show both the innovation and strengt h of tradition in contemporary Aboriginal art.

Regina Pilawuk Wilson’s artwork will also be on view this summer at the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia and at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. in the Marking the Infinite exhibition of Aboriginal paintings by established women artists.

EXHIBITION SPONSORS

The Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia, Durrmu Arts Aboriginal Corporation, Embassy of Australia, and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts

Opening Reception - Friday, May 25, 5:30pm

Gallery Tour with Aboriginal Artist Regina Wilson - Saturday, May 26, 2:00pm

 

Gallery Tour with Henry Wilson

Saturday, May 26, 2018
10:30am | Kluge-Ruhe

Tour with Aboriginal Artist and Curator Henry Wilson

Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection | May 26, 10:30 am

 

These paintings are a symbol of our cultural legacy. We need to keep this legacy strong.” Artist Regina Pilawuk Wilson

Ngunguni is an exhibition of paintings on eucalyptus bark from northern Australia. In 2017, the Kluge-Ruhe Collection received a request from the small art center of Durrmu Arts in the West Daly Region for images and information about artworks from their community held in its collection. After seeing this information, the elders proposed a project to revitalize bark painting in their region. This exhibition is a result of this exchange, and includes earlier artworks from the 1960s alongside contemporary works created this year, all from West Daly.

Opening Reception | Ngunguni

Thursday, May 24, 2018
5:30 | Kluge-Ruhe

Ngunguni: Old Techniques Remain Strong

Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection
May 24 - September 9, 2018

 
“These paintings are a symbol of our cultural legacy. We need to keep this legacy strong.” Artist Regina Pilawuk Wilson

Ngunguni is an exhibition of paintings on eucalyptus bark from northern Australia. In 2017, the Kluge-Ruhe Collection received a request from the small art center of Durrmu Arts in the West Daly Region for images and information about artworks from their community held in its collection. After seeing this information, the elders proposed a project to revitalize bark painting in their region. This exhibition is a result of this exchange, and includes earlier artworks from the 1960s alongside contemporary works created this year, all from West Daly.
 
Regina Wilson’s artwork will also be on view this summer at Second Street Gallery in Charlottesville, Virginia and at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. in the Marking the Infinite exhibition of Aboriginal paintings by established women artists. 

Opening Reception, May 24, 5:30 – 7:30 pm

Tour with Aboriginal Artist and Curator Henry Wilson, May 26, 10:30 am

Karenne Wood | Stone, Bone, and Clay

Saturday, May 5, 2018
Scottsville | 3pm

"Stone, Bone, and Clay" will be the title of a talk by Karenne Wood at Victory Hall in Scottsville, VA, on Saturday, May 5, at 3 p.m.

Karenne Wood, Director of the Virginia Indian Program at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, a member of the Monacan Indian Nation, and an anthropologist, will examine the deep history of American Indian presence in what we now call Virginia and consider how our understanding of that history has changed with archaeological discoveries.

Wood will also analyze the ways in which that story has been presented and how Native people have come to be seen as people of the past through the interpretations of museums and historians, policy makers, and popular media.   She'll consider these issues from a Native perspective and offers ideas intended to expand the story we tell about Virginia's first people.

In 2015, Wood was honored as one of Virginia's Women in History.  She has published two books of poetry, Markings on Earth (2000) and Weaving the Boundary (2016), and The Virginia Indian Heritage Trail.

Recently, the Monacan people, along with five other Virginia Indian nations, was accorded federal recognition, restoring a history too often erased.

See you at Victory Hall (401 Valley Street, Scottsville, VA) on Saturday, May 5, at 3 p.m!  Admission is free.

Reflections: Native Art Across Generations

Thursday, May 24, 2018
The Fralin Museum of Art

Curated by Adriana Greci Green, Curator of Indigenous Arts of the Americas

Reflections: Native Art Across Generations brings together historic Native American art drawn from the collections of The Fralin Museum of Art with the work of several distinguished contemporary Native artists. This exhibition establishes connections between past and present creative traditions and forms, exploring the idea of legacy and the meanings and inspirations that works of art carry through the generations. The invited artists also provide personal perspectives that link their work with the aesthetic artistry, technical skill, cultural knowledge and mastery of media that sustain indigenous artistic practices. Artists today create within established formal traditions but are also fully engaged with contemporary art discourses of personal and cultural identity, place, and the legacies of colonization.

Exhibition Dates: May 24, 2018 - January 27, 2019

Image: Kay WalkingStick, Cherokee, b. 1935. Bear Paw Battlefield #2, 2003. Gouache and charcoal with encaustic on paper, 25 x 50 in (63.5 x 127 cm). Museum purchase with funds from the Graham Fund, University of Virginia Alumni Association, 2004.11. © Kay WalkingStick

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