Raymond Bulambula

Visiting Fellow Raymond Bulambula guides a UVA art student in making a "Marratjirri" Morning Star Pole.

Fayerweather Studio

Fayerweather Hall, McIntire Department of Art at the University of Virginia

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Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia

Fralin

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia

Gallery Talk & Weaving Demonstration

Artist Lily Hope (Tlingit)
Tuesday, January 22, 2019
1pm | The Fralin Museum of Art

Gallery Talk & Weaving Demonstration

Lily Hope (Tlingit)

Tuesday, Jan 22, 1-3:30pm

The Fralin Museum of Art

Lily Hope weaves Ravenstail and Chilkat textiles. Her ensemble, Little Watchman (on display in the exhibition Reflections: Native Arts Across Generations at The Fralin Museum of Art) blends the two styles. Lily is Tlingit Indian, of the Raven moiety; following her matrilineal line, she’s of her grandmother’s clan, the T’akdeintaan,  originating from the Snail House in Hoonah, Alaska. She teaches both styles of weaving in the Juneau community, in the Yukon Territory, down the coast of SE Alaska and into Washington and Oregon, and lectures on the spiritual commitments of being a weaver. 

Lily Hope is a Mellon Indigenous Arts Visiting Artist from January 22-25, 2019. 

Image:Lily Hope's Lineage Robe on her loom. It is now part of the collection of the Portland Art Museum: Lily Hope, Lineage Robe, 2017, thigh-spun merino wool, cedar bark, hand-dyed merino wool, beaver fur, Museum Purchase: Funds provided by bequest of Elizabeth Cole Butler by exchange, © Lily Hope, 2017.51.1

Weaving Demonstration by Lily Hope

Thursday, January 24, 2019
1:30pm | The Fralin Museum of Art

Weaving Demonstration

Lily Hope (Tlingit)

Thursday, Jan 24, 1:30-3:30pm

The Fralin Museum of Art

Lily Hope weaves Ravenstail and Chilkat textiles. Her ensemble, Little Watchman (on display in the exhibition Reflections: Native Arts Across Generations at The Fralin Museum of Art) blends the two styles. Lily is Tlingit Indian, of the Raven moiety; following her matrilineal line, she’s of her grandmother’s clan, the T’akdeintaan,  originating from the Snail House in Hoonah, Alaska. She teaches both styles of weaving in the Juneau community, in the Yukon Territory, down the coast of SE Alaska and into Washington and Oregon, and lectures on the spiritual commitments of being a weaver. 

Lily Hope is a Mellon Inidgenous Arts Visiting Artist from January 22-25, 2019. 

Image:Lily Hope's Lineage Robe on her loom. It is now part of the collection of the Portland Art Museum: Lily Hope, Lineage Robe, 2017, thigh-spun merino wool, cedar bark, hand-dyed merino wool, beaver fur, Museum Purchase: Funds provided by bequest of Elizabeth Cole Butler by exchange, © Lily Hope, 2017.51.1

Weaving Demonstration by Lily Hope

Wednesday, January 23, 2019
1:30pm | The Fralin Museum of Art

Weaving Demonstration

Lily Hope (Tlingit)

Wednesday, Jan 23, 1:30-3:30pm

The Fralin Museum of Art

Lily Hope weaves Ravenstail and Chilkat textiles. Her ensemble, Little Watchman (on display in the exhibition Reflections: Native Arts Across Generations at The Fralin Museum of Art) blends the two styles. Lily is Tlingit Indian, of the Raven moiety; following her matrilineal line, she’s of her grandmother’s clan, the T’akdeintaan,  originating from the Snail House in Hoonah, Alaska. She teaches both styles of weaving in the Juneau community, in the Yukon Territory, down the coast of SE Alaska and into Washington and Oregon, and lectures on the spiritual commitments of being a weaver. 

Lily Hope is a Mellon Indigenous Arts Visiting Artist from January 22-25, 2019. 

Image: Lily Hope's Lineage Robe on her loom. It is now part of the collection of the Portland Art Museum: Lily Hope, Lineage Robe, 2017, thigh-spun merino wool, cedar bark, hand-dyed merino wool, beaver fur, Museum Purchase: Funds provided by bequest of Elizabeth Cole Butler by exchange, © Lily Hope, 2017.51.1

Opening Reception : Kent Morris "Unvanished"

Thursday, January 17, 2019
5:30pm | Kluge-Ruhe

 

The Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection invites you to a reception to celebrate the opening of our newest exhibition “Kent Morris: Unvanished.”  No reservations are needed.

Unvanished is a series of digitally constructed photographs by contemporary Melbourne-based Barkindji artist Kent Morris. His photographs explore the relationship between contemporary Indigenous Australian identity and the modern built environment, highlighting the resilience of Indigenous people in the face of constantly changing circumstances and their ongoing connections to place amidst urban and suburban development. This exhibition is sponsored by Australia Council for the Arts and the UVA Parents Fund.

Beyond Dreamings Symposium

Friday, February 22, 2019
Harrison/Small Auditorium

Beyond Dreamings Symposium

Feb. 21-23, 2019

The Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection presents a symposium around the current exhibition Beyond Dreamings.

The 1988 exhibition Dreamings: The Art of Aboriginal Australia at the Asia Society Galleries in New York catapulted Aboriginal art onto the world stage. Dreamings was the first major introduction of Aboriginal art to American audiences and represented a major turning point in its international reception. Anthropologist Fred Myers describes it as the moment when “Aboriginal art emphatically became “fine art.” Dreamings also signaled a radical shift in the ways Indigenous artists and communities were represented in the modern museum. This symposium celebrates three decades since Dreamings, reconsidering its historical moment and examining its legacies. Speakers include artists, curators, art historians, anthropologists and critics who will consider the future of contemporary Indigenous Australian art in the post-Dreamings era.

SCHEDULE

  • 9:30 am: Coffee and refreshments
  • 10:00 am – 12:00 pm: When Aboriginal Art Became Fine Art, with John Carty, Peter Sutton, Françoise Dussart, Chris Anderson and Fred Myers.
  • 12:00 pm: Lunch
  • 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm: Indigenous Australian Art in Contemporary Art Discourse, with Terry Smith, Maia Nuku and Henry F. Skerritt
  • 5:30 – 7:00 pm: Reception at the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA (note that this event is in a different location, a 20 minute drive from Harrison Small Auditorium)

Find more information on the Kluge-Ruhe website HERE

 

Image: The "Beyond Dreamings" exhibition currently on display at the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection at UVA. 

Keynote, Beyond Dreamings Symposium

Thursday, February 21, 2019
5pm | Harrison/Small Auditorium

Aboriginal Art Over the Last 30 Years 

Keynote Address by Indigenous Curator Djon Mundine

5pm, Harrison/Small Auditorium

Beyond Dreamings Symposium - Feb. 21-23, 2019

The Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection presents a symposium around the current exhibition Beyond Dreamings.

The 1988 exhibition Dreamings: The Art of Aboriginal Australia at the Asia Society Galleries in New York catapulted Aboriginal art onto the world stage. Dreamings was the first major introduction of Aboriginal art to American audiences and represented a major turning point in its international reception. Anthropologist Fred Myers describes it as the moment when “Aboriginal art emphatically became “fine art.” Dreamings also signaled a radical shift in the ways Indigenous artists and communities were represented in the modern museum. This symposium celebrates three decades since Dreamings, reconsidering its historical moment and examining its legacies. Speakers include artists, curators, art historians, anthropologists and critics who will consider the future of contemporary Indigenous Australian art in the post-Dreamings era.

Find the full symposium schedule HERE

Image: The "Beyond Dreamings" exhibition currently on display at the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection at UVA. 

 

Artist Talk | Lily Hope

Wednesday, January 23, 2019
6pm | CAM 153

Artist Talk by Lily Hope (Tlingit)

Mellon Indigenous Arts Visiting Fellow

January 23 | 6pm | CAM 153

The Mellon Indigenous Arts Initiative and The Fralin Museum of Art are pleased to present an artist talk by Mellon Indigenous Arts Visiting Fellow Lily Hope. Please join us for the talk and a brief recpetion. 

Lily Hope weaves Ravenstail and Chilkat textiles. Her ensemble, Little Watchman (above, on display in the exhibition Reflections: Native Arts Across Generations) blends the two styles. Lily is Tlingit Indian, of the Raven moiety; following her matrilineal line, she’s of her grandmother’s clan, the T’akdeintaan,  originating from the Snail House in Hoonah, Alaska. She teaches both styles of weaving in the Juneau community, in the Yukon Territory, down the coast of SE Alaska and into Washington and Oregon, and lectures on the spiritual commitments of being a weaver. 

DATE/TIME Wednesday, January 23, 2019, 6pm

LOCATION Campbell Hall, room 153. Nearest FREE parking is the Culbreth Rd Garage

CONTACT Adriana Greci Green, Curator of Indigenous Arts of the Americans, Fralin Museum of Art, ag2wq@virginia.edu

 

Pocahontas Reframed Film Festival

Thursday, November 15, 2018
Historic Byrd Theatre, Richmond, VA

The Pocahontas Reframed Storytellers Film Festival stems from a passion and desire for indigenous languages, cultures, and societies to thrive. The Festival strives to bring together artists, authors, filmmakers, and actors willing to share, teach, and explain their creativity and history. The Festival includes Native American-affiliated classic and recently released films that have been official selections of world-renowned festivals including the Sundance Film Festival, the South by Southwest Film Festival, and the Toronto International Film Festival.

The schedule for the 2018 Pocahontas Reframed Film Festival will feature work by current Mellon Indigenous Arts Faculty Fellow Federico Cuatlacuatl and 2018 Mellon Indigenous Arts Visiting Fellow Shelly Niro! Check out the full festival schedule here

TICKETS $10 Weekend Pass / $35 VIP Pass. Purchase tickets here.

Performance | Guillermo Gómez PeñA

Wednesday, November 14, 2018
5pm | Harrison Small Auditorium

Guillermo Gómez Peña

2018-19 Ruffin DIstinguished Artist in Residence

In his latest solo work, renowned artist Guillermo Gómez Peña, in residence at UVa in Fall 2018, combines new and classical performance material, drawn from nearly 30 years of a living artistic archive, to reflect upon the most pressing issues of our world today: gender, race, democracy, and equality in a world of global community and local polarization.

Please join us on November 14 at 5 pm in the Harrison Small Auditorium (outside of Special Collections) for an exciting performance that invites us to rethink the intersections of art, activism, and the academy.

Sponsored by the McIntire Department of Art.

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