Fayerweather Hall, McIntire Department of Art at the University of Virginia

Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia

Indigenous Peoples' Day

Monday, October 9, 2017

 

Several weeks ago Charlottesville City Council formally changed Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples' Day!  

Indigenous Peoples' Day is a holiday celebrated in many U.S. cities to honor and acknowledge the past and continuous presence of Native people in the Americas. It began before 1992 as a protest of Columbus Day, with Native groups contending that Columbus did not “discover” them—they were already here—and that the actions of Columbus and his men were not only less than heroic toward their ancestors, but that they committed genocide while invading and stealing their land. At least fifty cities and municipalities are now celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day rather than Columbus Day.  

Ways to Celebrate

 

Learn About Australian Indigenous Art and Culture
Monday, October 9, lunchtime tour and discussion at 12 pm, Kluge-Ruhe Collection

Kluge-Ruhe is usually closed on Mondays, but we will be open on Indigenous Peoples Day! Come visit the museum on your own or bring a lunch and join for a discussion.

Celebrate at the City Council Meeting
Monday, October 9, 7:00 pm, Charlottesville City Hall

Charlottesville City Council will officially present the proclamation of Indigenous Peoples Day to Monacan tribal elder Karenne Wood. Don't miss this historic moment for local Indigenous people in our city.

Acknowledge Monacan People
 October 9 and year-round

It is a common practice in Australia to acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land at the beginning of any occasion or program. Are you in a position of regularly holding public events or hosting them? Consider beginning every event with a brief acknowledgment of the Monacan nation. It is a way of showing awareness and respect for the Indigenous custodians of the land and may be delivered by a non-Indigenous person. Here are scripts written by Monacan tribal leader Karenne Wood and Kluge-Ruhe for you to use:    

“Please join me in acknowledging and paying respect to the traditional custodians of the land we are on today, the Monacan people.”

OR 

“We acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land we are on today, the Monacan Nation, and pay our respect to their elders past and present.”

If you begin doing this, please let us know! We would like to keep track of individuals and organizations who are choosing to honor Indigenous people in this way.

Support Indigenous Peoples' Day

Sunday, October 8, 2017
6:00pm | Free Speech Wall

Join local Native people and supporters at the Free Speech Wall here in Charlottesville to hold a press conference about Indigenous Peoples' Day and talk about why it matters.

Indigenous Peoples’ Day is a holiday celebrated in many U.S. cities to honor and acknowledge the past and continuous presence of Native people in the Americas. It began before 1992 as a protest of Columbus Day, with Native groups contending that Columbus did not “discover” them—they were already here—and that the actions of Columbus and his men were less than heroic toward their ancestors. Some states, such as California and Tennessee, celebrate Indigenous Peoples' Day on different dates, but many have chosen the second Monday in October. At least fifty cities and municipalities have also chosen to proclaim this day. The first official observance in Charlottesville will be next Monday, October 9, 2017

 

Info Session: Diversity in Museums and the Arts

Wednesday, October 18, 2017
5:30pm | FHL 102

Diversity in Museums and the Arts

Career Exploration Info Session

Wednesday, October 18, 5:30-7:00pm

Fayerweather Hall Lounge, Room 102

Dinner Included.

Open to UVA undergraduate students from all fields of study who are interested in careers in museums or the arts.

  • Meet graduate students, faculty, and staff with experience in museums and the arts.
  • Learn about PAID internship opportunities for African American, Hispanic American, and Native American students.
  • Get access to career development resources at UVA.

RSVP via Handshake: https://virginia.joinhandshake.com/events/82818/share_preview

Questions? Contact Amanda Wagstaff, aw2pz@virginia.edu

This Career Exploration Series is supported by Mellon Indigenous Arts, the McIntire Department of Art, and Career Services at UVA. 

Artist-led Discussion: Photography & Disappearance

Wednesday, September 27, 2017
3:30-4:45pm | Fayerweather 102

Discussion with artists Shelley Niro and ElizaBeth Hill

Hosted by ARTH 3591 Art History Colloquium: Photography and Disappearance with Clair Raymond

Shelley Niro (Six Nations Reserve, Bay of Quinte Kanien’kehaka Mohawk Nation) is a multimedia artist whose iconic visual narratives incorporate photography, painting, sculpture, poetry, film, and beadwork to disrupt stereotypes of Indigenous identities and histories. ElizaBeth Hill (Mohawk) is a singer-songwriter whose music reflects both her Native background and her past experience living and working in Nashville, Tennessee. Hill writes lyrics in both English and Mohawk and composes music for dance, theatre, and film.

FREE, open to the public.

Film Screening: Robert's Paintings

Tuesday, September 26, 2017
1:00pm | Fayerweather 102

Film Screening & Discussion

with filmmaker Shelley Niro and musician ElizaBeth Hill

Hosted by ARTH 3595: Indigenous North American Arts with Adriana Greci Green

Robert’s Paintings is about artist Robert Houle. Like many of his generation, Houle was schooled in the residential school system. He expressively talks about his experiences there. He has created a body of work encapsulating his memories from childhood. As an adult and teacher, he uses this opportunity to give witness to his life and the many others who passed through the corridors of what is now known as Canada’s shame.

In the film we will meet friends and family who will share stories about Robert and what his paintings mean to them. This film is about not forgetting and contributing to the collective memory of a nation. It is a celebration.

FREE, open to the public. 

Sponsored by Arts Enhancement Fund for 2017-18 from the Office of the Provost & the Vice Provost for the Arts

Lecture: Ian McLean

Thursday, October 5, 2017
6:00pm | Second Street Gallery

"Indigenous Art: Can it be contemporary art without already being modern?"

Guest Lecture by Ian McLean

Second Street Gallery, 115 Second Street SE, Charlottesville, VA 22902

Ian McLean is Hugh Ramsay Chair of Australian Art History, University of Melbourne and Senior Research Professor of Contemporary Art at the University of Wollongong

 

 

Artist Talk & Weaving Workshop

with Raymond Bulambula & Joyce Naliyabu
Saturday, September 30, 2017
10:00am | Kluge-Ruhe

Schedule of Events

10:00am - Meet-and-greet with Raymond & Joyce
Bodo's Bagels and coffee provided.

10:30am - Artist Talk 
Artist Raymond Bulambula, artist Joyce Naliyabu and art center manager Chris Durkin will discuss bark paintings and other artworks from their community of Milingimbi.

11:15am - Weaving Demonstration
Joyce Naliyabu is a weaver of fish traps, dilly bags and mats, and she will give a weaving workshop following the artist talk. The workshop is free, open to the public, and open to ages 10 and up, but registration is required. REGISTER HERE.

ElizaBeth Hill in Concert

Thursday, September 21, 2017
6:00pm | The Fralin Museum of Art

The Fralin Museum of Art, the Mellon Indigenous Arts Initiative, and the McIntire Department of Music of the University of Virginia present ElizaBeth Hill in Concert.

ElizaBeth Hill (Mohawk) is a singer-songwriter whose music reflects both her Native background and her past experience living and working in Nashville, Tennessee. Hill writes lyrics in both English and Mohawk and composes music for dance, theatre, and film. Hill is visiting the University at a Mellon Indigenous Artist in Residence along with fellow artist Shelley Niro (Six Nations Reserve, Bay of Quinte Kanien’kehaka Mohawk Nation). 

This event is free and open to the public.

Please RSVP 434.243.2050

 

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