Raymond Bulambula

Visiting Fellow Raymond Bulambula guides a UVA art student in making a "Marratjirri" Morning Star Pole.

Fayerweather Studio

Fayerweather Hall, McIntire Department of Art at the University of Virginia

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Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia

Fralin

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia

Indigenous Art Perspectives on Nuclear Fallout

Thursday, March 11, 2021
7:00pm EST, virtual event

Indigenous Art Perspectives on Nuclear Fallout

In this webinar discussion, Indigenous artists Will Wilson (Diné/Navajo) and Yhonnie Scarce (Kokatha/Nukunu) will share their artworks that address nuclear testing on Indigenous lands in the United States and Australia respectively, as well as the deep and lasting impact it had on the First Nations people of those lands. For introductory resources on these histories, click here for Trinity in the USA and click here for Maralinga in Australia. Elizabeth Wise, a graduate student at the University of Oklahoma who is completing her thesis on this topic, will moderate the discussion.

This program is co-presented by The Fralin Museum of Art, the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection, and the UVA Mellon Indigenous Arts Initiative.

Register at this link, or at kluge-ruhe.org

Image: Yhonnie Scarce, Thunder Raining Poison, 2015.

Alaska Native Reclamation and the Persistence of Indigenous Aesthetics

Talk by Nadia Jackinsky-Sethi
Tuesday, March 2, 2021
1:00 - 3:00 pm EST, virtual event

Please join us for a free talk offered via Zoom by Nadia Jackinsky-Sethi (Alutiiq) on 'Alaska Native Reclamation and the Persistence of Indigenous Aesthetics.'

Nadia Jackinsky-Sethi is an Alutiiq art historian based in Homer, Alaska. She focuses her research on Alaska Native arts, Indigenous aesthetics, cultural revitalization, and the representation of Indigenous identity in art. Jackinsky-Sethi enjoys working with rural communities in Alaska to help develop community-based arts program through her work at The CIRI Foundation, where she oversees a grant program dedicated to supporting customary Alaska Native arts practices. In addition, Jackinsky-Sethi is a curatorial consultant, writer, and occasional instructor of Alaska Native art history at the University of Alaska Anchorage. She completed her PhD in art history at the University of Washington in 2012.

Jackinsky-Sethi is a Mellon Indigenous Arts Visiting Fellow. Her Zoom presentation is hosted by ARTH3595: Indigenous North American Arts taught by Professor Adriana Greci Green. Log in to the talk using this link:
https://virginia.zoom.us/j/98278672705?pwd=Z0dJZVFmRXp4eVBFQWlFOU5zY0d5dz09

Meeting ID: 982 7867 2705
Passcode: 184179

Email cew9f@virginia.edu with questions.

Photo: Gut parkas hang in the breeze at Mekoryak, 1964. Steve McCutcheon, Steve McCutcheon Collection; Anchorage Museum, B90.14.4.02001.

 

Black History in Indian Country

Talk by Marilyn Vann
Wednesday, February 24, 2021
7:00pm EST, virtual event

UVA's Native American Student Union will be hosting Marilyn Vann for a virtual event discussing Black History in Indian Country in honor of Black history month. Marilyn Vann is a Cherokee Nation citizen and president of the Descendants of Freedmen of the 5 Civilized Tribes Association. She is currently running for Cherokee Nation Tribal Council in the at-large district. Vann was one of several participants in a series of lawsuits that eventually secured Cherokee Freedmen descendants full and equal citizenship in the Cherokee Nation. According to the association, "President Marilyn Vann has spoken on freedmen issues at the Federal Bar Association Indian Law Section Conference, as well as the University of California, Indiana University, University of Arkansas, University of Louisville, University of Kansas, University of Oklahoma and the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation conference."

The event will be held over zoom and Facebook live. Join the event here:  https://fb.me/e/19xnu2ijA

Talk by America Meredith

Indigenous Artworks of the Southeast from 1400 CE to the Present
Tuesday, February 23, 2021
1:00 - 3:00 pm EST, virtual event

Please join us for a talk by America Meredith on Indigenous Artworks of the Southeast from 1400 CE to the Present.

America Meredith (Cherokee Nation) is the publishing editor of First American Art Magazine and an art writer, critic, visual artist, and independent curator, whose curatorial practice spans 28 years. Based in Norman, Oklahoma, she earned her MFA degree from the San Francisco Art Institute and taught Native art history at the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe Community College, and Cherokee Humanities Course.

Meredith is a Mellon Indigenous Arts Visiting Fellow. This presentation on Zoom is hosted by ARTH 3595: Indigenous North American Arts with Professor Adriana Greci Green. Join the free talk here.

Save the date for her artist talk on March 24 at 6:00 pm, and an additional class visit on March 31, 3:30 - 5:30 pm.

Photo: Martha Berry (Cherokee Nation), “Fire Carrier’s Footsteps,” glass seed beads on wood, saved-edge stroud, leather, silk satin ribbon, 4 x 8 x 9 in. © Martha Berry. Photo: Dave Berry

I See Myself: Diversity in Children's Literature

Virginia Festival of the Book
Thursday, March 25, 2021
4:00 pm EST, virtual event

Angela Dominguez (Stella Díaz Dreams Big), Vashti Harrison (Little Dreamers), and Dub Leffler (Once There Was a Boy) discuss the importance of diversity in children’s literature and how their past and current projects embrace inclusive storytelling, from stories that highlight Mexican-American childhood and include Spanish vocabulary, to books that celebrate Black leaders and engage with Indigenous Australian identity and history.

As part of the all-virtual 2021 Virginia Festival of the Book, this event is FREE to attend and open to the public. To attend, please register here or simply make plans to watch on Facebook.com/VaBookFest. The video recording from this event will also be available to watch after the event concludes, on VaBook.org/Watch.

This event is sponsored by VA Festival of the Book, Australia Council for the Arts, the Mellon Indigenous Arts Initiative, and the Vice Provost for the Arts at UVA.

Visit here to read more about Dub Leffler's exhibition and virtual spring artist residency at Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection.

Double Draw Dare with Tom Angleberger & Dub Leffler

Thursday, March 18, 2021
7:00 - 7:45 pm EST, virtual event

Children’s book author-illustrators Tom Angleberger (DJ Funkyfoot! Butler for Hire) and Dub Leffler (Kluge-Ruhe Resident Artist) take part in this interactive event for ages five and up, discussing their award-winning books for young readers. Fun for all ages!

This event is part of Dub Leffler’s virtual residency at Kluge-Ruhe and is part of the all-virtual 2021 Virginia Festival of the Book.  This event is FREE to attend and open to the public. To attend, please register using this link or simply make plans to watch on Facebook.com/VaBookFest. The video recording from this event will also be available to watch after the event concludes, on VaBook.org/Watch.

This event is sponsored by VA Festival of the Book, Australia Council for the Arts, the Mellon Indigenous Arts Initiative, and the Vice Provost for the Arts at UVA.

Gabriel Maralngurra in conversation with Henry Skerritt

Mellon Indigenous Arts Visiting Fellow
Friday, March 5, 2021
7:00pm EST, virtual event

Gabriel Maralngurra is a founding member of Injalak Arts, a cooperative of Indigenous artists from the Aboriginal community of Gunbalanya in northern Australia which was formed in 1989 to promote Kunwinjku art and culture. As an artist and educator, he is a driving force behind the art center, which he currently co-manages. As a painter and printmaker, his work encompasses a wealth of subject matter, from ancestral narratives, plants and animals, through to imagery of early colonial encounters. Inspired by the extensive rock art of his homelands, his work is characterized by its confidence and fluidity, as well as its restless innovation. Maralngurra takes seriously his role in educating both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Kunwinjku culture. This role has seen him travel widely throughout Australia and the world. In January 2020 he undertook a residency at the University of Virginia to coincide with the launch of The Inside World: Contemporary Aboriginal Memorial Poles at The Fralin Museum of Art. His work is held in the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection, the National Museum of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria, and the British Museum.

During his virtual residency, Maralngurra will work closely over several sessions with students in ARTH 2882: Sex Spirits and Sorcery. This will culminate in a public webinar at 7pm on Friday 5 March, 2021 in which Maralngurra will discuss the long history of art at Gunbalanya and the role of Injalak Arts in strengthening Kunwinjku culture. Register for the webinar here!

Photo by Tom Cogill

 

We Have Words For Art

A Symposium on Writing about Art by Indigenous Peoples of the Americas
Sunday, February 28, 2021
1:00- 5:30 pm EST, virtual event

This free virtual 2-day symposium organized and hosted by First American Arts Magazine is open to anyone interested in learning how to write about arts of Indigenous Peoples.

Schedule for Sunday, February 28 (EST):

  • 1:00–1:30 pm: Adrienne Lalli Hills, “The Nuts and Bolts of Exhibition Text,” 30 minutes
  • 1:30–2:15 pm: Miranda Belarde Lewis, “Indigenous Art for Mainstream Art Audiences,” 45 minutes
  • 2:15–2:30 pm: Break, 15 minutes
  • 2:30–3:30 pm: Roundtable Discussion: “Walking the Line,” 1 hour
  • 3:30–3:45 pm: Break, 15 minutes
  • 3:45–4:45 pm: Roundtable Discussion: “Criticism of Indigenous Art of the Americas,” 1 hour
  • 4:45–5:15 pm: Open Forum, 30 minutes
  • 5:15–5:20 pm: c:a+m writing workshop introduction

Free and open to the public. You can register here.

Co-sponsored in part by the Mellon Indigenous Arts Initiative.

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