Raymond Bulambula

Visiting Fellow Raymond Bulambula guides a UVA art student in making a "Marratjirri" Morning Star Pole.

Fayerweather Studio

Fayerweather Hall, McIntire Department of Art at the University of Virginia

KR Banner

Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia

Fralin

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia

Opening / Gallery Tour: Hearts of our People: Native Women Artists

Friday, February 21, 2020
10: 00 am and noon, Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian/ Washington DC

The groundbreaking exhibition Hearts of our People: Native Women Artists opens at the Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian, Washington DC on February 21, 2020. 

From https://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/native-women-artists: "This landmark exhibition is the first major thematic show to explore the artistic achievements of Native women. Its presentation at SAAM’s Renwick Gallery includes 82 artworks dating from antiquity to the present, made in a variety of media from textiles and beadwork, to sculpture, time-based media and photography. At the core of this exhibition is a firm belief in the power of the collaborative process. A group of exceptional Native women artists, curators, and Native art historians have come together to generate new interpretations and scholarship of this art and their makers, offering multiple points of view and perspectives to enhance and deepen understanding of the ingenuity and innovation that have always been foundational to the art of Native women."

The exhibition will open with a welcome and land acknowledgement at 10:00 am (details here), followed by a gallery talk by curators Jill Ahlberg Yohe and Teri Greeves at noon (details here).

The exhibition runs until May 17, 2020. 

Related events: 

In Charlottesville: February 26, 6:00 pm, Lecture by Adriana Greci Green, "Exceptionally Creative: A Virtual Tour of Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists", Campbell Hall 158, UVA School of Architecture. Details here.

In Washington DC: March 28, 2:00 - 5:30 pm, Symposium: Thoughts of our People from Hearts of our People, National Museum of the American Indian. Free, seating is first-come, first-served. Details here.

Arts Beyond the Streets -- Artist Talk

Sunday, February 23, 2020
4: 00 pm, McGuffey Art Center/ 201 2nd St NW, Charlottesville

On February 23, hear visiting artists from Makhanda, South Africa, discuss their works currently on view at McGuffey Art Center through February 2020. The artist talk will be held in the Sarah B. Smith Gallery, and is free and open to the public.

Arts Beyond the Streets is a month-long a collaboration of painting, music, dance, and mixed media between members of the Black Power Station in Makhanda, South Africa and members of McGuffey Art Center. Arts Beyond the Streets grew from long-standing relationships between artists in Charlottesville, Virginia and Makhanda, South Africa. In a celebration of arts and inclusiveness, several artist-activists will be traveling from Makhanda, South Africa to collaborate with Charlottesville artists and cultural groups on a series of events during the month of February: free art activities, workshops, and dialogues welcome to all community residents. The McGuffey Art Center is hosting an exhibition of work from professional artists and youth from the Makhanda community.

From the McGuffey web site: "The main purpose of Arts Beyond the Streets is to foster collaborations and build solidarity between artists and art centers that are deeply embedded in their own respective communities. 

Although they are more than 8,000 miles apart, both Charlottesville and Makhanda have racialized histories by which systemic oppression disadvantaged persons of color through racist ideologies and movements. Artistic collaboration within and across cultures is extremely valuable in the process of healing and generating further change. Arts Beyond the Streets promotes art programming that is accessible to all, so that it can be used as a form of communication between people of all different walks of life.

The Black Power Station is a pioneering arts space within the re-emerging industrial area of Makhanda, South Africa. It is a liberated space where everyone contributes to its taking shape. It is a free and open space where people can come year-round to enjoy and participate in dialogue and other various forms of artistic expression. The Black Power Station seeks to be an alternative venue that facilitates arts to its fullest."

Arts Beyond the Streets Collaborative Performance

Saturday, February 22, 2020
6:00 - 7:00 pm, McGuffey Art Center/ 201 2nd St NW, Charlottesville

Join the McGuffey Arts Center for a free, collaborative performance featuring McGuffey resident Lillie Williams with Chihamba, and Black Power Station artists Xolile (‘X’) Madinda and Andiswa (‘Bliss’) Rabeshu, who are visiting from Makhanda, South Africa.

The performance is related to McGuffey's February 2020 exhibition, Arts Beyond the Streets, a collaboration of painting, music, dance, and mixed media between members of the Black Power Station in Makhanda South Africa and members of McGuffey Art Center. Arts Beyond the Streets grew from long-standing relationships between artists in Charlottesville, Virginia and Makhanda, South Africa. In a celebration of arts and inclusiveness, several artist-activists will be traveling from Makhanda, South Africa to collaborate with Charlottesville artists and cultural groups on a series of events during the month of February: free art activities, workshops, and dialogues welcome to all community residents. The McGuffey Art Center is hosting an exhibition of work from professional artists and youth from the Makhanda community.

From the McGuffey web site: "The main purpose of Arts Beyond the Streets is to foster collaborations and build solidarity between artists and art centers that are deeply embedded in their own respective communities. Although they are more than 8,000 miles apart, both Charlottesville and Makhanda have racialized histories by which systemic oppression disadvantaged persons of color through racist ideologies and movements. Artistic collaboration within and across cultures is extremely valuable in the process of healing and generating further change. Arts Beyond the Streets promotes art programming that is accessible to all, so that it can be used as a form of communication between people of all different walks of life.

The Black Power Station is a pioneering arts space within the re-emerging industrial area of Makhanda, South Africa. It is a liberated space where everyone contributes to its taking shape. It is a free and open space where people can come year-round to enjoy and participate in dialogue and other various forms of artistic expression. The Black Power Station seeks to be an alternative venue that facilitates arts to its fullest."

Read more about the artists and event here.

WORKSHOP: Bark/Skin: Painting with Natural Pigments-- CANCELLED

Thursday, March 12, 2020
6:00 - 7:30 pm, Second Street Gallery/ 115 Second St SE, Charlottesville

CANCELLED due to COVID-19 restrictions

In conjunction with its exhibition By the Strength of Their Skin, Second Street Gallery is hosting a FREE bark painting workshop inspired by SSG exhibiting artist Noŋgirrŋa Marawili.

Participants will paint with natural ochres on small wood boards using brushes we make onsite. The workshop will be led by Lauren Maupin and Fenella Belle of the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection.

There is no fee to participate, but you must RSVP to reserve your place. Ages 8 and up.

Please email lou@secondstreetgallery.org to reserve your spot today.

LUNCH AND GALLERY TALK, By The Strength of Their Skin

Talk by Henry Skerritt
Friday, February 28, 2020
12:00 - 1:00 pm, Second Street Gallery/ 115 Second St SE, Charlottesville

Join Henry Skerritt, Curator of Indigenous Arts of Australia (Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection), for lunch and a talk about Second Street Gallery's exhibition By the Strength of Their Skin, which features the works of three senior and highly regarded female Aboriginal artists, Noŋgirrŋa Marawili, Mabel Juli, and Regina Pilawuk Wilson. More information about the artists and exhibition here.   

Lunch and talk will take place at Second Street Gallery. $25 per person, $20 for members of SSG. RSVP to Lou Haney at lou@secondstreetgallery.org by February 26.

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